Women's Engineering Society

Women's Engineering Society

15/01/2017

 

We are delighted to be working with the Women's Engineering Society advising on storytelling and design in the lead up to their centenary celebrations. They were founded in 1919 when a group of women engineers who had made a significant contribution to the war effort objected to being dispatched back to the kitchen once the war was over.

They decided to campaign instead to support more women working in engineering. Their founders had close links to the suffragette movement and even today WES continues to use the suffragette colours - Green White Violet - standing for Give Women Votes!

 

By: Emma

Happy Christmas from the Graphic History Company

Happy Christmas from the Graphic History Company

20/12/2016

 

A very Merry Christmas and a Happy New year from all of us at the Graphic History Company.

 

By: The GHC

Hachette: The Author Mural wins best interior project at the 2016 british sign awards

Hachette: The Author Mural wins best interior project at the 2016 british sign awards

03/11/2016

 

We are feeling both proud and humble today to have won our first agency award for our Author Mural at Hachette UK.

Proud because it was a labour of love from the depth of our research into nearly 250 years of literary history to the drawing by hand of 4,000 author names.

Humble because we were up against some seriously stunning projects that were also shortlisted, including a beautiful display of paper butterflies for Monsoon. Wow.

 

By: Emma

Discovering FHK Henrion

Discovering FHK Henrion

10/10/2016

 

As part of our research into the history of UAL London College of Communication we have stumbled upon the inspiring figure of FHK Henrion - a.k.a. the Godfather of Corporate Identity - a name he earned for his groundbreaking work in the 1950s for KLM and other large corporates.

Yet this impressive moniker is not even the most impressive thing about him. German born Henrion fled 1930s Germany as a teenager - first to Paris then to London only to be confined in an internment camp as an 'alien' on the Isle of Wight at the outbreak of the Second World War.

That is until he somehow managed to demonstrate his design and communications skills at which point he was immediately given a job by the Ministry of the Information to create posters that became crucial to the war effort such as Dig for Victory, Aid the Wounded and Off the Ration.

 

By: Emma

St. Brides a hidden treasure

St. Brides a hidden treasure

10/10/2016

 

Tucked away behind busy Fleet Street is the beating heart of the old printing trade. It was here that the wonderfully named Wynkyn de Worde, apprentice to William Caxton set up the first printing press in the area - strategically placed between his biggest clients - the Law Courts on one side and St Pauls Cathedral on the other. Before long the publishers and newspaper industries moved in and the area became synonymous with the printed word. In the centre of it all stands The St Bride Foundation, founded by Queen Victoria in 1891 to support those working in the printing trade. It still stands there today - a hidden treasure with a fascintating archive, print libary and a workshop teaching traditional printing techniques. Truly worth a visit.

 

By: Emma

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