St. Pauls Survives

St. Pauls Survives

24/09/2016

 

Taken on the night of 29/30 December 1940 during the Blitz, this photograph of St Paul's Cathedral now stands just a few meters away from where it was originally taken - on the rooftop of the Daily Mail's wartime offices, now home to Hachette UK.

Churchill realised the importance of St Paul's as a symbol of hope for London and was determined that it should remain standing through the German bombing raids. He ordered firefighters to surround the cathedral and fend off flames from adjacent burning buildings. The moment was captured by photo-journalist Herbert Mason, who climbed to the roof to take this now iconic photograph. He said of the moment:

"I focused at intervals as the great dome loomed up through the smoke. Glares of many fires and sweeping clouds of smoke kept hiding the shape. Then a wind sprang up. Suddenly, the shining cross, dome and towers stood out like a symbol in the inferno. The scene was unbelievable. In that moment or two I released my shutter."

The photograph became instantly famous as a symbol of British resilience and courage.

 

By: Emma

Lining the Corridors with Literary History

Lining the Corridors with Literary History

24/09/2016

 

Lining the corridors of Hachette - in stark contrast to the intensity of the author mural, we have created a simple, minimal company timeline featuring foundation dates of each imprint in the group, seminal works of literature, Nobel, Booker and Orange prize winners and key moments in the history of the company. 1953 was a big year for the company - with the publication of The Ascent of Everest - and Winston Churchill's Nobel Prize for literature.

 

By: Emma

Installing the Author Mural at Hachette UK

12/09/2016

 

We've been hard at work this weekend - installing 250 years of history in the form of 4000 author names, in CAD cut vinyl over 5 floors of these lovely offices by the Thames.

Time for a drink we think.

 

By: The GHC

Running in the footsteps of Gustav I, Founder of modern Sweden

Running in the footsteps of Gustav I, Founder of modern Sweden

20/08/2016

 

This weekend Andy completed the Ultravasan - an historic 90km ultra marathon from Mora to Sälen in Sweden.

The Ultravasan follows the same route as the Vasaloppet cross country ski race, whose route was inspired by the origins of the Swedish uprising against the Danes, led by Gustav Eriksson Vasa, later Gustav I, founder of modern Sweden and “father of the nation”, in 1520.

Following the Stockholm bloodbath, in which his father was killed, Gustav Eriksson was determined to mount a rebellion to expel from Sweden Christian II’s invading Danish troops.

He began in Mora, asking the people to join with him to fight the Danes. They declined. So he set off westwards towards the Norwegian border, seeking support along the way. The people of Mora then had a change of heart and sent their two fastest skiers to track down Gustav and return with him to begin the rebellion. They caught up with him just as he was entering Sälen with the good news that they would fight with him.

Together they defeated the Danes and Gustav was crowned King, entering Stockholm in a triumphant procession in June 1523.

Gustav's route from Mora to Sälen remains one of the oldest and highest attended endurance events in the world, with 70,000 people competing each year. Andy completed it in an impressive 9 hours, 11 minutes, 32 seconds.

Congratulations Andy!

 

By: The GHC

Kate Forrester wins pitch for hand-lettering

Kate Forrester wins pitch for hand-lettering

05/05/2016

 

We are excited to commission hand-lettering artist and illustrator Kate Forrester to create a 'River of Authors' for Hachette UK.

As a bonus, we get to spend some time with her in her seaside studio in Brighton.

 

By: Emma

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