Discovering FHK Henrion

Discovering FHK Henrion

10/10/2016

 

As part of our research into the history of UAL London College of Communication we have stumbled upon the inspiring figure of FHK Henrion - a.k.a. the Godfather of Corporate Identity - a name he earned for his groundbreaking work in the 1950s for KLM and other large corporates.

Yet this impressive moniker is not even the most impressive thing about him. German born Henrion fled 1930s Germany as a teenager - first to Paris then to London only to be confined in an internment camp as an 'alien' on the Isle of Wight at the outbreak of the Second World War.

That is until he somehow managed to demonstrate his design and communications skills at which point he was immediately given a job by the Ministry of Information to create posters that became crucial to the war effort such as Dig for Victory, Aid the Wounded and Off the Ration.

 

By: Emma

St. Brides a hidden treasure

St. Brides a hidden treasure

10/10/2016

 

Tucked away behind busy Fleet Street is the beating heart of the old printing trade. It was here that the wonderfully named Wynkyn de Worde, apprentice to William Caxton set up the first printing press in the area - strategically placed between his biggest clients - the Law Courts on one side and St Pauls Cathedral on the other. Before long the publishers and newspaper industries moved in and the area became synonymous with the printed word. In the centre of it all stands The St Bride Foundation, founded by Queen Victoria in 1891 to support those working in the printing trade. It still stands there today - a hidden treasure with a fascintating archive, print libary and a workshop teaching traditional printing techniques. Truly worth a visit.

 

By: Emma

Hachette: The Author Mural launch party

Hachette: The Author Mural launch party

27/09/2016

 

Not only did they let us loose on the walls of their lovely offices - they gave us a party too! We had a wonderful evening launching our mural at Hachette UK & sipping champagne on their beautiful roof terrace overlooking the river. Thank you Hachette UK!

 

By: Emma

St. Pauls Survives

St. Pauls Survives

24/09/2016

 

Taken on the night of 29/30 December 1940 during the Blitz, this photograph of St Paul's Cathedral now stands just a few meters away from where it was originally taken - on the rooftop of the Daily Mail's wartime offices, now home to Hachette UK.

Churchill realised the importance of St Paul's as a symbol of hope for London and was determined that it should remain standing through the German bombing raids. He ordered firefighters to surround the cathedral and fend off flames from adjacent burning buildings. The moment was captured by photo-journalist Herbert Mason, who climbed to the roof to take this now iconic photograph. He said of the moment:

"I focused at intervals as the great dome loomed up through the smoke. Glares of many fires and sweeping clouds of smoke kept hiding the shape. Then a wind sprang up. Suddenly, the shining cross, dome and towers stood out like a symbol in the inferno. The scene was unbelievable. In that moment or two I released my shutter."

The photograph became instantly famous as a symbol of British resilience and courage.

 

By: Emma

Lining the Corridors with Literary History

Lining the Corridors with Literary History

24/09/2016

 

Lining the corridors of Hachette - in stark contrast to the intensity of the author mural, we have created a simple, minimal company timeline featuring foundation dates of each imprint in the group, seminal works of literature, Nobel, Booker and Orange prize winners and key moments in the history of the company. 1953 was a big year for the company - with the publication of The Ascent of Everest - and Winston Churchill's Nobel Prize for literature.

 

By: Emma

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